Sensational Leg Anatomy
Part 1 of Sensational Yoga Anatomy

Sensational Leg Anatomy helps you learn to control the muscles of your legs so that you get a better feel for your leg muscles, hip joints, knee joints, feet and ankles.

Sensational Leg Anatomy cover page. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.

If recovering from injury or pain (knees or hips or even feet), these exercises can provide a basis for fault finding and fixing faulty movement patterns since they include both a sensing component and a control component.

If you are flexible but lack control (i.e. you can "flop" into the splits but you can't lower yourself into them with control) these exercises may be helpful for turning on your muscles so that you improve your control.

If you want to work towards flexibility, or better stability, these exercises can be the foundation for approaching flexibility training intelligently. The better you are at controlling your muscles, the easier it is to get more flexible. (Since control means in part, being able to turn your muscles off as well as on.)

Sensational Leg Anatomy is a series of 5 minute or less videos each describing an exercise or series of exercises to help you develop a feel for individual groups of muscles in your legs.

Exercise progressions are make it easy for you to learn to feel your anatomy by starting with bigger muscles, and from there learning to feel your joints, and bones with special attention payed to learning to feel your hip bones.

Not only will you learn to feel your muscles, you'll also learn to self adjust, for optimum muscle activation.

All exercises are done while standing (or sitting in a chair).

Flexibility is not a requirement for these exercises.

Buy now

Sensational Leg Anatomy ($60)
Plus Hamstring Flexibility ($80)

You can also use this URL (copy it and paste it directly into your browser:

https://gumroad.com/l/leganatomy

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These are the exercises that I use regularly in my classes.

The exercises have been refined to make it as easy as possible for students of a various abilities to learn to feel their bodies.

The exercises themselves give you a sense of how muscles in different parts of the body move those parts in different directions.

1. Learning to Feel and Control the Front and Backs of the Thighs and Hips

In the first part (there are four parts) you'll learn to feel the muscles that work on the front and back of the thighs and hips:

  • the vastus muscles at the front of the thigh,
  • the hip flexors that attach to the front "point" of the hip bone (the ASICs), rectus femoris, tensor fascia latae and sartorius
  • the hamstring muscles that form the bulk of the back of the thigh
  • and gluteus maximus, the butt muscle.

You'll also learn to feel and control your outer hip muscles and thighs (Tensor fascia latae, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus) and inner thigh muscles (Sartorius, Gracilis, the Adductors)

Note that there is some overlap between these muscles and the muscles at the front and back of the thighs.

Creating Stability

An important idea in sensational leg anatomy is the idea of creating stability. Stability is basically "resistance to change".

Another important idea that is related is the idea of "Anchoring Muscles". You anchor one end of a muscle so that it can activate effectively.

Each exercise includes instruction on how to create stability. This can include keeping a particular part of the body still while you try to activate a particular set of muscles.

2. Joint Stabilization and Control

The second part of Sensational Leg Anatomy focuses on joint activation.

Where muscle activation tends to focus on the sensation that muscles generate within themselves, joint activation tends to focus on the sensation created in connective tissue, tendons and ligaments.

These muscle activations could be thought of as "joint stabilization" exercises.

You'll learn to stabilize and feel: the hips, the knees, the joints of the ankle and foot.

3. Lower Leg Control Via the Floor

The third part of Sensational Leg Anatomy focus on the shin, foot and knee. This section also touches on the hip bones.

You'll learn to rotate the shin using lower leg muscles that connect to the foot (tibialis anterior, peroneus longus and brevis, tibialis posterior etc). These same muscles can be used to flatten or accentuate the inner arch of the foot.

You'll also learn to rotate the shin relative to the thigh using "the long hip muscles" (tensor fascia latae, gluteus maximus, sartorius, gracilis, semitendinosus).

The Long Hip Muscles

For want of a better name the "long" hip muscles are the muscles that attach between the pelvis and the lower leg (tibia and fibula).

These muscles are noteworthy because all of them attach to prominent leverage points of the hip bone (ASICs, Pubic bone, PSIS, Sitting bones) and from there to the lower leg bones. Most of them pass over some larger muscle also, whether the vastus muscles of the quadriceps or as in the case of the superfical glute maximus fibers, over the deeper fibers of the gluteus maximus.

When the shin is stabilized via the foot muscles, these long hip muscles can be used to help control (and stabilize) the hip bone (one half of the pelvis.)

Front view shin stabilizers, gracilis, semitendinosus, sartorius, tensor fascia latae, rectus femoris (superior fibers of gluteus maximus not shown), IT band. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.
Front view: The long hip muscles (gluteus maximus not included). Note the spaces these muscles pass over that is filled by the vastus muscles and adductors.

Taking Out the Slack for Better Muscle Control

Along with creating stability, another important aspect of muscle control is "taking out the slack".

A part of learning the to feel and control the long hip muscles is taking out the slack from by using, in some instances, the vastus muscles which you learned earlier..

And that's actually an important idea that you can learn from this course, (and even from this intro). Tension in one muscle can affect tension (beneficially) in other muscles. If a muscle is too slack to effectively activate, you can activate other muscles (that are in contact with the muscle in question) to take out the slack.

Stabilizing the Heel for Rotational Shin Stability

The third section of sensational leg anatomy also looks at heel control and toe control as well as general foot control.

Heel control can be important because without it its very easy for the inner arch to collapse, particularly during impact that can be experienced while running (whether you land on your heel, midfoot or forefoot).

4. Feeling and Controlling the Hip Bones

The fourth part focuses on learning to feel and control the hip bone.

One way to control the hip bone is via the long hip muscles learned in part 3. With a stable shin and foot you can use these muscles to easily control the hip bone.

Another important set of muscles for controlling the hip bones (relative to the femur) is the deeper hip muscles including the obturators, gemellus superior and inferior, gluteus minimus and medius.

Reducing SI Joint Stress

The fourth part also includes a short section on feeling your spine. In this section the sacrum is included as part of the spine. This is so that you can practice stabilizing the hip bone relative to the leg then stabilize the spine (including the sacrum) relative to the hip bone.

This technique may help to avoid excessive stress on the SI Joint.

Learn to Feel Your Body

Overall, the goal of this course is not to encourage you to isolate your muscles all of the time, but to be able to feel and control your body without having to think about how to do it.

It's basically like learning to drive.

And so one of the final videos teaches you about intent. You actually practice intent throughout most of the exercises, this last is just a way of wrapping it up.

Course Structure

The course is divided into short videos of a maximum of 5 minutes each. There are 50 videos in all.

Each focuses on simple exercises that you should be able to learn and then practice without requiring the video.

The instructions are simple, easy to remember so that you can focus on improving your ability to feel and control your body while doing the exercises.

Exercise Positions

Most of the exercises are done while standing, with a few (mainly the shin rotation work) done while sitting in a chair. That means that you don't have to be flexible to do the exercises in this course.

Completing the Course Day by Day, Little Bits at a Time

Because each video is only five minutes, you can conceivably watch a video a day, ideally in the morning or last thing at night. You can then practice the exercises throughout the day.

The videos are also short enough that you can easily make notes of the exercises contained in each video if you wish. The vary act of writing them down (or figuring out how to write them down) can act as an extra memory aid.

Get Started Now

Because there are so many exciting and different courses out there, this course is designed so that it is easy to get on with doing it. Work is required, but rather than having to read through lots of pages (or watch hours of video), with sensational anatomy, you can watch short videos with simple exercises that you can get on with practicing now. You do have to do a lot of work but its the type of work that can be enjoyable because you are learning to better feel and control your own body.

You may find that because the focus is on feeling and controlling, you think less, you worry less.

How Important is Alignment in this Course?

Note that rather than focusing on exact alignment, you'll learn to self adjust, basically finding your alignment internally. And that's one of the main advantages of learning to feel and control your body. With enough practice you'll know when you are in the right position just by being able to feel it.

How are the Exercises Executed?

For all exercises, the focus in this course is on slow and smooth activation and slow and smooth relaxation.

Initially you can do sudden activation and relaxation, just to get a basic feel for your muscles. But once you have that the idea is to learn to activate and relax them smoothly and slowly. The exercises can then become like deep breathing exercises and have a similiar affect. Even though you aren't focusing on your respiratory muscles you may find that your breathing naturally becomes slow and smooth.

Two Options

Option 1 is sensational leg anatomy. You'll learn to feel and control the muscles of your leg as described above.

Option 2 includes the above option 1 plus Anatomy and Muscle Control for Hamstring Flexibility. The Hamstring Flexibility video shows you how to use the techniques learned in sensational leg anatomy to help improve hamstring flexibility in a standing forward bend.

Sensational Leg Anatomy ($60)
Plus Hamstring Flexibility ($80)

You can also use this URL (copy it and paste it directly into your browser:

https://gumroad.com/l/leganatomy

Downloads have 1280x720 resolution and are in mp4 format.

30 Day Money Back Guarantee

If you aren't satisfied, let me know within 30 days and I'll give you your money back.

Note that all videos are streamable or downloadable.

Designed and Presented by Neil Keleher

This course has been designed and is presented by me, Neil Keleher. Nearly all of it is based on techniques that I've taught in my classes. It's also based on what my own experiences dealing with pain, injury, lack of flexibility. Prior to becoming a yoga teacher I worked as an test engineer. And before that I fixed guns while I was in the army. In all cases what I've found is that the better you understand something the easier it is to fix, and the easier it is to improve.

Smart Body

Sensational yoga anatomy (in this case, sensational leg anatomy) is designed to help you experience the anatomy of you own body so that you better understand it. It's not going to turn you into a yoga master or make you instantly flexible or pain free. But it will give you some of the tools you need to work towards those things.

Ask yourself why smartphones are smart compared to normal phones. They have a huge touch screen, a sensor, instead of buttons. And they can respond to touch in different ways. That's what makes them smart.

You don't need to upgrade your body to become body smart, you just need to learn how to use the sensors and actuators that are already built into it.

Another important idea of this course is to make you less reliant on guru's or fitness experts, to give you the necessary tools so that you can determine for yourself what is right or wrong for your body.

Leg Anatomy Pictures

Front view: obturator externus along with pectineus and iliacus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front view:
The obturator externus, viewed from the front.
The vastus muscles: vastus medialis (red), vastus intermedius( violet), vastus lateralis (blue green). Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.
Front view:
Vastus muscles at the front of the thigh. These straighten the knee and can help stabilize it against gastrocnemius and/or hamstrings.
Front View, vastus muscles as tensing mechanisms for shin stabilizers, vastus lateralis, medialis, intermedius, sartorius, gracilis, tensor fascia latae, IT band. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front view:
here you can see the long hip muscles with the vastus muscles. Note that the adductor muscles, particularly adductor magnus, may also play a role in tension control of the long hip muscles.
Front view shin stabilizers, gracilis, semitendinosus, sartorius, tensor fascia latae, rectus femoris (superior fibers of gluteus maximus not shown), IT band. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front view:
The long hip muscles (gluteus maximus not included). Note the spaces these muscles pass over that is filled by the vastus muscles and adductors.
Hip flexors including: Sartorius (green), rectus femoris (red) and tensor fascia latae via the IT band (blue). Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.
Front view:
Hip Flexors (Rectus Femoris, Sartorius, Tensor Fascae Latae). These all attach from the ASICs (or just below it) to the tibia.
Front view: adductor magnus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front View:
Adductor magnus. This picture attempts to capture the "twist" of the adductor magnus.
Front view, Gracilis, adductor longus, adductor brevis, pectineus, iliacus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front View:
adductor brevis and longus. Both of these adductors attach to the back edge of the femur. Note how they are positioned in front of Adductor Mangus.
Front view, adductor longus and biceps femoris short head. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front View:
Relationship between adductor brevis and biceps femoris shorthead.
Front view, adductor magnus middle fibers and biceps femoris short head. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Front View:
Relationship between adductor magnus (middle fibers) and biceps femoris shorthead.
Side view. Here you can see the deep portion of gluteus maximus, the part that attaches to the femur. Also included, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, adductor magnus, biceps femoris longhead and shorthead. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Side view right leg
This picture shows the deeper portion of the gluteus maximus. This portion attaches to the back of the femur.
Side View, vastus lateralis muscle with IT band, tensor fascia latae and superficial portion of gluteus maximus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Side View Right Leg
Vastus Lateralis, along the outside of the thigh, with the IT band running over it. Note the Tensor Fascia Latae and the Gluteus Maximus.
Rear view obturator internus, gemellus superior, gemellus inferior, quadratus femoris. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Rear view:
Obturator externus, gemellus superior, gemellus inferior viewed from the rear.
Rear View: Hamstring muscles, biceps femoris long head and short head (attach to fibula), semimembranosus, semitendinosus (attach to tibia). Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Rear view left leg
The Hamstring muscles. Except for the Biceps Femoris short head, all of these attach to the sitting bone or Ischial Tuberosity. At the lower end, they attach to the tibia (semitendinosus and semimembranosus) or the fibula (biceps femoris longhead and short head).
Inside view: semitendinosus, semimembranosus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Inner view Left Leg:
Here you can see the two inner hamstring muscles semimembranosus and semitendinosus. Note how the semimembranosus attaches to the tibia closer to the knee joint than the semitendinosus.
Medial view: vastus lateralis, sartorius, gracilis, semitendinosus, pes anserinus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Inner view Left Leg:
Vastus medialis, sartorius, gracilis, semitendinosus.
Inside or medial view, tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Medial View
In this "inside" or "medial" view of the shin you can see tibialis posterior as well as tibialis anterior.
Side view: tibialis anterior. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Lateral View:
In this "outside" or "lateral" view of the shin you can see tibialis anterior that runs down the front of the shin.
Lateral view tibialis anterior, peroneus longus. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Lateral View:
Outer view of lower leg showing Peroneus Longus
Lateral view: tibialis anterior, peroneus brevis. Neil Keleher. Sensational Yoga Poses.Lateral View
Lateral view of lower leg showing Peroneus Brevis

Sensational Leg Anatomy ($60)
Plus Hamstring Flexibility ($80)

You can also use this URL (copy it and paste it directly into your browser:

https://gumroad.com/l/leganatomy